International Day of Happiness

Int Day Of Happiness Logo

This campaign is a global celebration to mark the United Nations International Day of Happiness. It is coordinated by Action for Happiness, a non-profit movement of people from 160 countries, supported by a partnership of like-minded organisations.

Register and receive • Happiness Guidebook • Happiness Pack for Kids • World Happiness Report

#InternationalDayOfHappiness

International Children’s Day

History of International Children’s Day

The origin of this holiday goes back to 1925, when representatives from different countries met in Geneva, Switzerland to convene the first “World Conference for the Wellbeing of Children”.

After the conference, some governments around the world designated a day as Children’s Day to highlight children’s issues. There was no specific date recommended, so countries used whatever date was most relevant to their culture.

Children’s Day around the world

In the UK National Children’s Day is celebrated on 12 May.

Some countries observe Children’s’ Day on 20 November as Universal Children’s Day. This day was established by the United Nations in 1954 and aims to promote the welfare of children around the world.

The date of 1 June is used by many ex-Soviet countries as ‘The International Day for Protection of Children’ established on 1 June 1950 following the Women’s International Democratic Federation’s congress in Moscow that took place in 1949.

According to The Metro, Children’s day is celebrated on June 1 each year by the following countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Benin, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, China, Cambodia, Czech Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macedonia, Macau, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Sao Tomé and Príncipe, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Tajikistan, Tanazia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Yemen.

Taiwan observes Children’s Day on 4 April.

Information from Office Holidays

See also:

National Children’s Day (UK) 12 May

International Children’s Day 1 June

Universal Children’s Day 20 November

Level 3 Forest School Practitioner Training

NOCN Level 3 Certificate in Forest School Programme Leadership (RCF)

This Forest School training course also includes a second week of training from 19th-23rd Nov 2018.

This course is an opportunity to explore to a higher level different approaches to using the outdoor environment in a Forest School setting, and is for those who, and wish to, coordinate, manage and lead Forest School sessions with children, young people or adults.

You will investigate how best to design and run a Forest School programme and look at how to approach and apply it safely and effectively.

This Forest School Level 3 course is aimed at individuals who have a minimum Level 2 qualification in Youth Work, Child Care, Teaching, or relevant experience in working with children.

The course content of this qualification is based on up-to-date research surrounding aspects of

  • Holistic development
  • Neuro-science
  • Theories of Learning and Development
  • Woodland conservation, history and management
  • Wellbeing and nature connection
  • Risk benefit assessments

Course Duration

  • Initial training week – consisting of 5 days of training
  • Portfolio work – candidates take away their portfolio to work on (for about 7 months)
  • First Aid – candidates complete a 2 day ITC outdoor paediatric first aid course at own cost
  • Second week – consisting of further training and benchmarking.

Participants on this course will need to complete a paediatric outdoor First Aid 2 day course before completing their Forest School training. (First Aid not included in price)

The venue has basic accommodation on site which costs approx £16 per night. Details of how to book accommodation will be sent with confirmation of course booking.

World Smile Day®

Smiley Face‘Harvey Ball, a commercial artist from Worcester, Massachusetts created the smiley face in 1963. That image went on to become the most recognizable symbol of good will and good cheer on the planet.

As the years passed Harvey Ball became concerned about the over-commercialization of his symbol, and how its original meaning and intent had become lost in the constant repetition of the marketplace. Out of that concern came his idea for World Smile Day®. He thought that we, all of us, should devote one day each year to smiles and kind acts throughout the world. The smiley face knows no politics, no geography and no religion.  Harvey’s idea was that for at least one day each year, neither should we. He declared that the first Friday in October each year would henceforth be World Smile Day®.

… be sure to join the celebration and “Do an act of kindness. Help one person smile”!’

#WorldSmileDay

Sand Play: The Magical Journey

two boys playing in a tray of sand

Sand Play and the use of small world figures and objects can transport us beyond ourselves. Its use in therapy with children, teenagers and adults is well established and it can be integrated into most therapeutic practice.

This one day workshop illustrates the basics of Sand Play and shows how it integrates sensory play, dramatic play and storytelling.

A range of toys will be shown in practice, and support for people acquiring the means to practice:

  • round or square trays or rectangular?
  • wooden or plastic or molded objects?
  • ethnic diversity?
  • weapons and soldiers?
  • vehicles on the ground and in the air?

And much much more!

The course demonstrates the developmental sequencing of Sand Play and the participants’ need to make their own choices in the play.

Reading:
Jennings, S. (1999) Introduction to Developmental Playtherapy,(foreword by Mooli Lahad), London: Jessica KingsleyJennings, S. (2011) Healthy Attachments and Neuro-Dramatic-Play, (foreword by Dennis McCarthy), London: Jessica Kingsley
McCarthy, D. (2015) Deep Play-Exploring the Use of Depth in Psychotherapy with Children. London: Jessica Kingsley

Fee
Fee includes tuition, illustrated notes, toys, full lunch and morning and afternoon refreshments.

Bursaries
A small number of bursaries are available, please contact Dr Sue Jennings directly at drsue@ndpltd.org

Who should attend?
Play Therapists, Creative Arts Therapists, Teachers, Psychotherapists and all those in the clinical and educational fields.

The course can be credited towards a Diploma in Neuro-Dramatic-Play, more information from: www.playanddramapartnership.org,www.neurodramaticplayltd.com

Dr Sue Jennings facilitates this course who has taught Sand Play in many countries both as a stand alone course as well as being part of the Neuro-Dramatic-Play Training programme. She is the pioneer of NDP and Dramatherapy and has published over 50 books. Her background is Social Anthropology and her research field-work in the Malaysia rainforest, with the Temiar people has influenced her practice in play and drama.

 

Landplay Therapy

Post qualifying training for Play Therapists, Counsellors and Psychotherapists.

This two-day training will provide you with the tools you need to extend your therapeutic practice to include indoor and outdoor sessions.

Landplay training ensures the practitioner is confident in providing safe and boundaried therapeutic play space in a natural outdoor environment. It encourages practitioners to incorporate a simplified tool kit with a focus on more natural materials.

Those participating in the training need to have studied Person Centred Counselling and be a qualified child and/or adult counsellor and/or need to have trained in Jungian or Person centred approach and have a post graduate qualification.

Working with Young People with Challenging Behaviour, in the Outdoors, with Jon Cree

This course is aimed at any educator who feels they want to engage and work with students in the outdoors who may be reluctant learners (of any age).

This course will delve into:

  • What challenges us as leaders in the outdoors
  • Theory on challenging behaviour
  • Up-to-date neural research; triggers and causes for challenging behaviour
  • Ways of dealing with ‘real life’ scenarios in the outdoors
  • De-escalation
  • How to transfer outdoor strategies into an indoor and other settings – including looking at the validity of sanctions and rewards
  • Reviewing your own policies.

Date: 17th, 18th & 19th June OR 20th, 21st & 22nd November 2019
Lead Facilitator: Jon Cree
Where: Mill Woods, East Sussex
Cost: £325 for the 3 day course, £55 for the Accreditation (optional). This Level 3 West Midlands Open College Network Accredited Course.
Time: 09.00 – 17.00.

Working with Young People with Challenging Behaviour, in the Outdoors, with Jon Cree

This course is aimed at any educator who feels they want to engage and work with students in the outdoors who may be reluctant learners (of any age).

This course will delve into:

  • What challenges us as leaders in the outdoors
  • Theory on challenging behaviour
  • Up-to-date neural research; triggers and causes for challenging behaviour
  • Ways of dealing with ‘real life’ scenarios in the outdoors
  • De-escalation
  • How to transfer outdoor strategies into an indoor and other settings – including looking at the validity of sanctions and rewards
  • Reviewing your own policies.

Date: 20th, 21st & 22nd November 2019
Lead Facilitator: Jon Cree
Where: Mill Woods, East Sussex
Cost: £325 for the 3 day course, £55 for the Accreditation (optional). This Level 3 West Midlands Open College Network Accredited Course.
Time: 09.00 – 17.00.