International Children’s Day

History of International Children’s Day

The origin of this holiday goes back to 1925, when representatives from different countries met in Geneva, Switzerland to convene the first “World Conference for the Wellbeing of Children”.

After the conference, some governments around the world designated a day as Children’s Day to highlight children’s issues. There was no specific date recommended, so countries used whatever date was most relevant to their culture.

Children’s Day around the world

In the UK National Children’s Day is celebrated on 12 May.

Some countries observe Children’s’ Day on 20 November as Universal Children’s Day. This day was established by the United Nations in 1954 and aims to promote the welfare of children around the world.

The date of 1 June is used by many ex-Soviet countries as ‘The International Day for Protection of Children’ established on 1 June 1950 following the Women’s International Democratic Federation’s congress in Moscow that took place in 1949.

According to The Metro, Children’s day is celebrated on June 1 each year by the following countries: Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Benin, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, China, Cambodia, Czech Republic, East Timor, Ecuador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea-Bissau, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macedonia, Macau, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Sao Tomé and Príncipe, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Tajikistan, Tanazia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam and Yemen.

Taiwan observes Children’s Day on 4 April.

Information from Office Holidays

See also:

National Children’s Day (UK) 12 May

International Children’s Day 1 June

Universal Children’s Day 20 November

Universal Children’s Day

Group of 5 smiling children

United Nations Universal Children’s Day was established in 1954 and is celebrated on November 20th each year to promote international togetherness, awareness among children worldwide, and improving children’s welfare.

November 20th is an important date as it is the date in 1959 when the UN General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. It is also the date in 1989 when the UN General assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Since 1990, Universal Children’s Day also marks the anniversary of the date that the UN General Assembly adopted both the declaration and the convention on children’s rights.

Mothers and fathers, teachers, nurses and doctors, government leaders and civil society activists, religious and community elders, corporate moguls and media professionals as well as young people and children themselves can play an important part in making Universal Children’s Day relevant for their societies, communities and nations.

Resources for educators here.

Photo credit: Students at Hadew primary school in Jijiga, Ethiopia. Photo: UNICEF/UN043870/Lister

See also

National Children’s Day (UK) 12 May

International Children’s Day 1 June

Universal Children’s Day 20 November

National Children’s Day

5 children sitting in a row with their arms around each other

National Children’s Day UK is all about the importance of a healthy childhood and how we need to protect the rights and freedoms of children in order to ensure that they can grow into happy, healthy adults.

You can run any big or small activity or event that you want for the week up to and including the day – but don’t forget to let us know what you are up to!

From small family get-togethers to local community events and talks – it’s a great opportunity to raise awareness about projects you are running or things you care about.

National Children’s Day

5 children sitting in a row with their arms around each other

National Children’s Day UK is all about the importance of a healthy childhood and how we need to protect the rights and freedoms of children in order to ensure that they can grow into happy, healthy adults.

You can run any big or small activity or event that you want for the week up to and including the day – but don’t forget to let us know what you are up to!

From small family get-togethers to local community events and talks – it’s a great opportunity to raise awareness about projects you are running or things you care about.

See also

National Children’s Day (UK) 12 May

International Children’s Day 1 June

Universal Children’s Day 20 November